First Saliva Test for COVID-19 Approved for Emergency Use by FDA

First Saliva Test for COVID-19 Approved for Emergency Use by FDA

The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the whole world with terror. Conducting a series of tests being the only option to track down the pandemic, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has passed the saliva-based test on April 13, 2020. Saliva based testing can serve to be a great alternative to the swab coronavirus testing that was used previously.

As of now, COVID-19 testing involves the medical team to insert a swab in the nostrils of the infected, each at a time, directly to the nasopharynx just beneath the nasal cavity. The test includes the scrapping of the tissue to collect specimens and then sending off to the laboratories for analysis. This method of testing the disease is really cumbersome and requires specific skills and qualified medical team to wear PPE, which are in a short supply. Adding to all these, there are many suburban areas in the US, which is experiencing a massive shortage of the test’s availability and a long list of previous samples to analyze.

In comparison to the generic testing type, the saliva-based testing needs spitting into a tube which is a lot less invasive procedure and does not require large numbers of personal protective equipment. According to the FDA, these tests still need to be conducted in a healthcare environment under some strict supervision of a qualified medical staff.

Several Types of Hurdles Are Leaving the Coronavirus Test Kits Unused

The recent global shortages of the swabs used as a generic method for sampling and testing can be solved, with this new method of saliva-based testing. Using saliva tests as a primary testing method would surely increase the testing numbers of patients and won’t even put the life of healthcare professionals at stake while collecting the samples. This method is built on the existing tag path of SARS-CoV-2 assay, that are in use by the generic testing methods to identify the RNA from the virus. A recent statement by Brooks states that in addition to the identification of the infection, saliva testing can also make the re-testing easier for the people who have recently recovered, in order to end their quarantine period.

In context with the validation results, provided by the US Food and Drug Administration, around sixty samples taken from swab tests and saliva tests are in agreement with the presence of the COVID-19 virus. In fact, the FDA notes that independent testing conducted by the New Jersey Health Department of around ten samples agreed with the findings of RUDCR.

A recent article of USA Today, states that these saliva-based tests can be conducted on patients as early as the 15th of April.

While each and every country is facing the pandemic with courage, doctors, nurses and the medical team still remains to be in the first line of defense. Current reports state that there is a massive shortage of trained nurses and medical staff in the US. In order to fulfill the shortage, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and some other American government organizations came up with some brilliant ideas and plans. Their plan includes several instructions for the nursing schools and Institutes of Higher Education of America to fight against this dreaded disease. Erudite online nursing schools, being an elite institution, has come up with many online accelerated nursing programs to help the existing nurses in their fight against the COVID-19 disease.


 

SOURCES

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/guidance-ihe-response.html

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/covid-19/controlprevention.html#health

https://www.fda.gov/home

Note: The foregoing article and information contained therein may be copyrighted and may not be reproduced in part or entirety without advance written permission. For permissions or editorial corrections, contact: Ms. Kelsey Hanna, khanna@EruditeNursing.education. All information is provided for informational purposes and deemed to be correct at the time of publication, but may change with or without notice; no guarantees are made as to accuracy and all liability is hereby released as to the same.

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