HOW DO NURSES DEAL WITH RACISM IN HEALTHCARE?

HOW DO NURSES DEAL WITH RACISM IN HEALTHCARE?

Studies have been exploring as to what health professionals understand about racism and how do they manage to deal with it in practice.

In an article, a new Journal of Advanced Nursing study examined the issue through five focus group discussions with 31 maternal, child, and family health nurses working across metropolitan South Australia. These clinicians represent the core professional group working with infants and families in the first years of life.

The study investigated how nurses conceive racism in practice and contribute to guaranteeing that children from various racial and ethnic backgrounds do not rack up further detriment in their lives through culturally unsafe healthcare practice.

Investigators uncovered how mixed understandings and misunderstandings about the nature of racism in practice. Also, where structural racism was identified, participants did not feel befitting to challenge it. The findings propose a crucial need for the introduction of anti-discriminatory education and training in the nursing workforce.

"Child health nurses work extremely hard to partner with the families with whom they work, but their practice is sometimes compromised because the frameworks used in their primary education is outdated. These results show that we urgently need interactive and sustained anti-racist education in pre-service, graduate, and workplace education," said author Dr. Julian Grant, of Flinders University, in Adelaide, South Australia. "Most importantly we need further research to find out what anti-racist approaches work best for Australian children and families."

Generally, same goes to us all healthcare professionals. We must value the notion of racism because it caters a lot of aspects as to where our service and dedication to practice rest. Together with Erudite Nursing Institute™, we encourage nurses to deeply understand the value of service regardless of race and culture treating patients fairly and equally.

 

LINK SOURCE:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-08/w-seh082118.php


Note: The foregoing article is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in part or entirety without advance written permission. For permissions or editorial corrections, contact: Ms. Kelsey Hanna, khanna@EruditeNursing.education

 

 

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