NORTH MASON STUDENTS BENEFITED FROM TWO PROGRAMS BY OLYMPIC COLLEGE NURSING STUDENTS

NORTH MASON STUDENTS BENEFITED FROM TWO PROGRAMS BY OLYMPIC COLLEGE NURSING STUDENTS

Nurses not only attend the needs of sick patients but they encourage self-growth and dental health among the youth in the community as well.

As part of Olympic College’s Bachelor of Science in nursing program — an advanced degree open to registered nurses wanting to progress in their field — nursing students need to complete field work that delved into the community health facet.

In an article, two groups of nursing students agreed to target Belfair — one focused on the social and emotional aspect of high school students, while the other group engage in dental hygiene at the elementary schools.

According to the state’s annual Healthy Youth Survey in 2016, Mason County middle- and high-school students were reported having more depression and suicidal tendencies (feelings and actions), and less support from adults when they felt hopeless than average students across the state.

“It was disturbing for us to learn that there was a 27% gap between sixth-, eighth- and 10th-grade youth in Mason County and the state when it came to students who reported having the social and emotional skills to cope,” said Jackey Kirsh, a nursing student at Olympic College.

Kirsh with her partners, Jessie Warfield and Emily Qian, worked at North Mason High School and the alternative James A. Taylor High School to provide students opportunities to discourse about traumatic life events, such as child abuse or the death of a family member.

At the span of over five months, they introduced resiliency games, invited speaker Kody Russell from Kitsap Strong to talk to students about trauma, presented posters with messages of hope and implemented a program called, “No One Dines Alone”, inspiring students to connect with others at lunch.

Other nursing students decided to promote oral hygiene in youth after learning that Smile Partners, a nonprofit that brings mobile dental clinics to schools, no longer served North Mason.

“We realized there was a need for dental attention,” Sarah Brown, one of the student nurses assigned with the program said. “Students with increased health disparities, like students in North Mason, often lack dental prevention and education. Our goal was to build rapport with the students and improve overall health.”

Colleen Doherty, a faculty member in the Olympic College program said, “The goal of the RN to BSN program is to give nurses a greater understanding of community health.”

Erudite Nursing Institute™ wants to train nurses not just on hospital settings but also on community-based programs, most especially with the youth and their families to have a greater well-being towards themselves and positive outlook on their health.

 

LINK SOURCE:

https://www.kitsapsun.com/story/news/local/2018/06/06/olympic-college-nursing-students-north-mason-youth/678181002/

 

Note: The foregoing article is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in part or entirety without advance written permission. For permissions or editorial corrections, contact: Ms. Kelsey Hanna, khanna@EruditeNursing.education

 

 

 

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