TOP STATES TO WORK AS A NURSE

TOP STATES TO WORK AS A NURSE

Nursing can be a strenuous job, but let’s admit, it’s quite rewarding. As for new nurses, of those who are just starting in their own career, great offers await for you.

So, where’s the best place to start your dream?

According to a newly published report from a financial website, WalletHub, the best state to work as a nurse is in Maine, followed by Montana and Washington, while the worst is the District of Columbia, with Hawaii and Vermont wrapping off the bottom three.

Nursing workforce is aging numbered with some of these professionals within this core seeking early retirement, thus multiplying the possibilities of hiring more nurses ever than before.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said, employment of registered nurses is projected to grow up to 15% from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Back to the aforementioned report, most nursing – job openings per capita can be found in Vermont, the District of Columbia and Maine (all ranked No. 1), followed by North Dakota and Alaska, while the fewest are in Mississippi, Utah, Nevada, Alabama and Arizona.

Nurses paid the highest annual nursing salary (adjusted for cost of living) in Arizona followed by Nevada, Wyoming, Michigan, and Texas, while lowest annual nursing salaries are in Hawaii, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Vermont and New York.

With these, listed below are the top 10 best states for nurses and to see the full list, click here.

 

SOURCE: www.health.usnews.com

 

Erudite Nursing Institute™, encourages aspiring individuals to enter the nursing career, in the midst of the industry’s present trials, the institute believes that this honorable job should not be overlooked out from the opportunities awaiting them.

 

LINK SOURCES:

https://health.usnews.com/wellness/health-buzz/articles/2018-05-03/the-top-10-states-for-nurses

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-for-nurses/4041/

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm#tab-6

 

Note: The foregoing article is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in part or entirety without advance written permission. For permissions or editorial corrections, contact: Ms. Kelsey Hanna, khanna@EruditeNursing.education

 

 

 

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