Why Novel Coronavirus Is So Deadly

Why Novel Coronavirus Is So Deadly

With the fatality rate increasing day by day, microbiologists and virologists stated that this new COVID-19 virus is a lot more dangerous than the previous Ebola pandemic, known to kill up to two-thirds of those who get infected. COVID-19, also termed as the Wuhan virus, remains to be an enigma for more than four months after its outbreak in China. After devastating China's economic hub, Wuhan, the virus did spread in a lightning-fast speed throughout the globe.

Detailed reports of various virologists state that the spiky crown-like structures on the walls of the novel coronavirus are what make it hazardous for humans. The proteins on the outer surface of the wall membrane allow the uncomplicated infection of human cells as they are a direct match to our cell receptors. The COVID-19 virus gets down to the lower part of our respiratory tract and binds the cell with a very high affinity. In case the cells die, the stretch gets filled with several types of cellular debris. Not only are these viruses responsible for destroying the respiratory tract, they even spill down and triggers the immune response of humans. COVID- 19 infection results in an overactive immune response, especially the lungs inflammation, which is the leading cause of a large number of cell deaths.

Researchers say that once a person gets infected, the virus mostly attacks the ACE-2 bearing cells that are primarily in line with our airways. As the infection speeds up, human lungs tend to clog with a considerable quantity of fluid and dead cells, making the process of breathing very difficult. The coronavirus even has the ability to infect other ACE-2 bearing cells of similar organs, which includes blood vessels and the gut.

During infection, the human immune system gives a tough fight by attacking the virus, resulting in high fever and causing inflammation. In most of the extreme cases, the immune may go berserk and may cause a lot more damage than the virus itself. Sometimes the blood vessels may open up a lot more, allowing the defensive immune system cell to reach the infection site. Thus, it might result in the vessels to be much leakier, causing the lungs to fill with even more fluid. These overreactions of the human body are called cytokine storms.

Looking at the current world scenario, the virus tends to tear the whole world of immunologically inexperienced people. With the graph of the infected rising steadily and death tolls reaching almost 96,000, it's a high time for us to give this spread a pause. For that, the U.S. needs some steady increase in the medical facilities and join hands with others who all are going through tough times. The health care facilities, including doctors, nurses, and other medical staff, are the kings and queens of this unknown checkerboard, fighting a war where the enemy is invincible.

To bring help to our medical team and fulfil the enormous shortage of trained nurses and other medical staff CDC or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has come up with many thoughts and strategies. Several instructions and ideas are given to the Higher Education Institutes and the nursing schools of America to cope up and start fighting the war against the COVID-19 virus. Erudite online nursing school, following all the protocols and guidelines of the CDC, has started offering many virtual accelerated nursing programs to the new and existing nursing staff of America. Erudite nursing school's highly effective certification course on emergency preparedness and response training for the nurses can help us win the fight against the dreadful pandemic.


 

SOURCES

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/guidance-ihe-response.html

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/covid-19/controlprevention.html#health

https://www.coronavirus.gov/

 

Note: The foregoing article and information contained therein may be copyrighted and may not be reproduced in part or entirety without advance written permission. For permissions or editorial corrections, contact: Ms. Kelsey Hanna, khanna@EruditeNursing.education. All information is provided for informational purposes and deemed to be correct at the time of publication, but may change with or without notice; no guarantees are made as to accuracy and all liability is hereby released as to the same.

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